Sunday, July 6, 2014


"Structured storage" redirects here. For the Microsoft technology also known as structured storage, see COM Structured Storage.
A NoSQL or Not Only SQL database provides a mechanism for storage and retrieval of data that is modeled in means other than the tabular relations used in relational databases. Motivations for this approach include simplicity of design, horizontal scaling and finer control over availability. The data structure (e.g. key-value, graph, or document) differs from the RDBMS, and therefore some operations are faster in NoSQL and some in RDBMS. There are differences though and the particular suitability of a given NoSQL DB depends on the problem to be solved (e.g. does the solution use graph algorithms?). The appearance of mature NoSQL databases has reduced the rationale for Java content repository (JCR) implementations.


There have been various approaches to classify NoSQL databases, each with different categories and subcategories. Because of the variety of approaches and overlaps it is difficult to get and maintain an overview of non-relational databases. Nevertheless, the basic classification that most would agree on is based on data model. A few examples in each category are:

  • Column: Accumulo, Cassandra, HBase
  • Document: Clusterpoint, Couchbase, MarkLogic, MongoDB
  • Key-value: Dynamo, FoundationDB, MemcacheDB, Redis, Riak, FairCom c-treeACE
  • Graph: Allegro, Neo4J, OrientDB, Virtuoso

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